Tag Archives: BugGuide

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Meloe niger. Kirby, 1837

Continuing with gallery updates, this time the popular oil (or  ‘blister’) beetle, Meloe niger, which I have written about before at The Black Oil Beetle. The strange appearance and  life cycle of this insect makes it a popular hit […]

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Formica ravida. Creighton, 1940

As I indicated earlier, I’ll be attacking a backlog of photographs this season, and here is the first updated gallery, from September 2011: Formica ravida Creighton, 1940 (as identified by James Trager at BugGuide). These ants were […]

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Red Leaf Beetles

Found these two red leaf beetles (possibly Tricholochmaea cavicollis) enjoying the view on the fringes of the pine sandhills at Halfmoon Lake Natural Area north of Edmonton.  A natural history fail on my part, I did not […]

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Bristle Fly?

The flies in the Family Tachinidae could very well take the common name of ‘Bristle Fly’, due to the many stiff hairs that cover the abdomen of many species. My dismal April Fool’s post was indeed a Tachinid […]

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Approaches to Macro Photography

How many paths to macro photography? Let me count the ways… the impulse shooter:  “Wow. Quick, grab a picture of that beautiful/weird/yucky bug! ” BugGuide receives many examples this kind of image every day. the natural […]

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Dogwood Calligrapha

Photographed in Edmonton Saskatchewan River valley, 28 May, 2013. ID’s by V. Belov and Jesús Gómez-Zurita at BugGuide. Compare it to Calligrapha verrucosa. (Canon 5D Mk II, EF 100mm f2.8 Macro lens, hand-held Canon 270 […]

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Alberta Oil (Beetle)

Last year, based on an oil beetle I photographed in Grasslands National Park, Sask.,  I jokingly mentioned that the oil beetle should be Alberta’s official insect, because we have so much of the oily stuff. Well, […]

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Working it out

Here is a brief example of how I might approach a co-operative subject: When I find an interesting insect to photograph, my first shot is considered as a record only. I keep shooting, trying each time to improve the shot over […]

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