Tag Archives: Dinosaur Provincial Park

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Just stick out your tongue and say “Aaaah”…

Dr. Phymata doing the obligatory health check before proceeding with the operation… (22 September, 2013. Dinosaur Provincial Park. Canon T2i with EF 100mm f2.8 macro lens and diffused flash. ISO 400, 1/200 sec. @ f11)  

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Ladybird Beetlebum

The afternoon was getting hot, and I was looking for some shade to sit down and enjoy my lunch and take a short nap. The problem was, I was on the northwest floor of the valley in […]

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Delicate Linyphiidae

This is a small male spider I came across while in Dinosaur Provincial Park last year. I saw it in wandering over a grass-head – I took a few photos for reference and left it […]

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Jumping Spider Habronattus cuspidatus revisited.

Reviewing earlier images, I came across this Habronattus cuspidatus photo, taken in Dinosaur Provincial Park last year. Perky, ain’t he, with the green legs and golden knees?  

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A Humble Gryllus

Field crickets were a part of my childhood in South Africa, more likely to be found in the home than cockroaches. So seeing them in the terrain of Dinosaur Provincial Park in southern Alberta brought with […]

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One Awkward Spider

This Ground Crab Spider (Xysticus sp.) seems to be imitating a meteor. It was found in this position just off the trail in Dinosaur Provincial Park – motionless but apparently undamaged. I examined it, and flicked the […]

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A Day in the Life

30 May, 2012, and on my second last day of a prairie photo tour. I usually wake up before the dawn, and this day is no exception. It is a cold morning. I rise from […]

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Melissa Blue

A female Melissa Blue (Plebejus melissa) basks on the sand in Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta. All blues are sexually dimorphic, with the males having a bluish dorsal wing surface and the females brown. This female has a sprinkling of blue […]

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