Tag Archives: Flora and Fauna

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Winter Focus-stacking Prep.

Lots to learn… One of my winter projects was to get to know the Stackshot focus-stacking system. However, this was difficult due to two problems: lack of subjects and too short a winter (you won’t […]

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Aquilegia Muncher

This may be a columbine sawfly larva with a taste for luxury, but does anyone know what could be eating this Aquilegia bloom? From June 23, 2011.  

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Wolf Spider

Wolf spiders are amoung the most commonly encountered arachnids when you’re outdoors bug-hunting with your camera. Most likely you’ll find them basking on sun-soaked tree trunks and docks, often with an egg case prominently attached to the spinnerets on […]

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A Thread-waisted Wasp–Ammophila

Last year I posted on the hoverfly that had its mouth-parts trapped by an ambush bug. That picture was taken toward the end of September, when flowering plants on the prairie are not very numerous. […]

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Blue Sky Blues

The most common way I approach a bug when doing macro photography is the ‘in-situ’ approach–I try to take the best shots possible, leaving the subject untouched, wherever it may be found. This not only […]

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Moth Night

On the 26 July this year I participated in a National Moth Week event at the Devonian Botanic Garden just a short drive west of Edmonton… It was a magical event, with participants of all […]

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Meadowhawk on Lichen

A cherry faced meadowhawk (Sympetrum internum) rests on reindeer lichen at the Halfmoon Natural Area, Alberta. (1 August, 2013. Canon 5Dk II with EF 100mm f2.8 macro lens and diffused flash. ISO 320, 1/200 sec. […]

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Little Lycosid

This is a little wolf spider (Lycosidae. Genus Pardosa ) that I found basking in the sun on a tree trunk at the Wagner Bog Natural Area. With the legs it was only about 6mm across, […]

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