Tag Archives: insect

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Book Review: The Complete Guide to Macro and Close-up Photography

Have you heard the phrase, “Write the book you want to read.“?  Well, when I first flipped through this book after I received my free copy in the mail,  my first thought was, Someone wrote […]

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Ento 101: the Abdomen

Long neglected, I am resuming with the Ento. 101 project. Please view the disclaimer at the bottom of the Entomology 101 page. Previous: Ento. 101–Legs. The Insect Abdomen (eidonomy for now, I’ll save the guts for later) […]

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Why an Iridescent Beetle?

On first glance, the Dogbane Leaf Beetle is a stunning metallic blue-green, that clearly stands out on the light-green Dogbane leaves it feeds on. However, when you look closer, you can see the highlights of […]

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The End is Near

Late summer: shorter days and cooler nights. This week we’ve had frost most nights, and it’s still not the middle of September. Last week, a walk along the damp sand and stone shoreline of the North Saskatchewan River found […]

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Introducing the Kunstkammer

Earlier this year I was thinking of occasionally adding old entomology prints to Splendour Awaits, but after dwelling on that idea for a while I thought it better not to dilute the photographic focus of this […]

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Enjoying the view

A green lacewing pauses on a leaf tip in the home garden. (Purchase at Zenfolio)

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Winter Focus-stacking Prep.

Lots to learn… One of my winter projects was to get to know the Stackshot focus-stacking system. However, this was difficult due to two problems: lack of subjects and too short a winter (you won’t […]

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Macro Tip #2: How to stop insects from moving

One of the most common questions I get in workshops is, “Was it alive when you photographed it?”, and when I insist that it was, the next question is invariably “So, how do you stop […]

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